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Why I Don’t Support “Cure Cancer” Foundations

admin September 25, 2010

Why I Don't Support Cure Cancer Foundations

I fully expect that this post (even its title!) will be met with incredible disbelief and very strong opinions.  Some of you, even now, may be reading this and thinking “How on earth can you not support a cure for cancer or the foundations that promote it?!”  Hopefully you’ll understand my position a little better once I’m finished explaining.  Some of you may even agree me (and some of you…perhaps begrudgingly!).  I feel like this is a really, really important topic, though, so I’m going to write about it.

Why I Don’t Support “Cure Cancer” Foundations

These days, “Cure Cancer” foundations are everywhere.  There are all kinds of walks and other sponsorship events to raise money for a cancer cure.  Many companies partner with these foundations, offering to donate a portion of their sales to the foundation.  I shudder and walk away when I see this.  The campaign has been referred to as “pink washing” by those who agree with me (because most of the major ones are breast cancer related), and that, sadly, is what it is.

I should note that I do believe many foundations started with good intentions.  But I don’t believe many are still operating under good principles, and I also believe the money is generally misspent.

The first thing I want to look at is how these foundations actually work.  When you are donating money to these causes, do you know how, where, and by whom it will be spent?  That’s the first thing I want to know before donating to any charity.

Let’s look at the Susan G. Komen Foundation first, as it is probably the most well-known cancer foundation.

Executive Salaries

At this foundation, the president/CEO makes about $532,000 per year.  The COO makes $332,000.  Several of the other top-level employees make between $150,000 and $250,000 per year.  In all, their “employee benefits and compensation” is over $22M a year.  The total amount they brought in was about $159M in 2009, so this means employees received about 14% of the annual contributions.  That seems awfully high to me.  (This information is all from 2009 and was pulled directly from the tax forms available on their website.)

While this is probably typical of all such foundations, I don’t support the ideas that top-level employees in a charitable foundation “need” to make $500,000 per year.  No one really needs to earn that much!  As Ben pointed out while we were doing the research for this post, that’s more than our president makes!  If you believe in the foundation’s mission, that is money that could be better spent going directly to research and programs.  Top-level employees could reduce their salaries to around $100,000 and an extra $3 – $4M could go towards actual research.  I’m assuming that would make a significant dent….

Poorly Chosen Partnerships

There’s also the problem of who organizations choose as partners.  Last spring, the Komen Foundation partnered with KFC.  While some might argue that a partnership is only to reach people who already patronize that organization (KFC, in this case), partnering with an organization also lends tacit support to that organization.  Does eating at KFC really reduce the risk of breast cancer?  Is buying a bucket of chicken in order to donate money to a cancer foundation really a good use of your money — or your nutrition?

The answer is no.  KFC’s food is absolutely awful for you.  MSG is among the top ingredients in all of their products.  That’s why they’re so addicting!  (No, I have not had KFC in many months.)  A “cure cancer” foundation lending their support and even tacit recommendation to a restaurant like KFC is a terrible idea because eating that food will actually promote cancer.  The organization needs to be much more selective in who it chooses to partner with.  It should be an important part of any cancer organization’s mission to promote a healthy lifestyle that will hopefully not lead one down the path of cancer in the first place.

Does Money Go to “Research,” Really?

This leads to another question: where is the rest of the money spent, and what constitutes “prevention?”  These ideas are related because the money is frequently spent on prevention (as well as research).  Cancer foundation research has led to the following:

  • Discovery of a genetic “link” that pre-disposes one towards breast cancer
  • More chemo drugs and related treatments
  • Increased rates of mammograms and other screening tests

These are all mainstream medicine, of course!

Does any of these things really cure cancer?  I would argue no.

The discovery of a genetic link has led to two things: one, that women who find they have it are worrying quite a bit and subjecting themselves to earlier and more frequent mammograms (and probably increased stress), and two, that many women believe that if they have the gene, there is nothing they can do: they are “destined” to get cancer.  This becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy, of course.  Mammograms are radiation, and more exposure to radiation (earlier in life and more frequent) will lead to increased rates of cancer.  Believing that one has no control over her destiny leads to making poor choices because “it doesn’t matter anyway,” which can also increase rates of cancer.

There are those rare people who decide that they are not going to let a genetic link slow them down; they make the best possible choices so that this gene will never be expressed.  That is the best idea!  However I know people who say “I have a family member who had breast cancer…so I’m sure I’m at increased risk!”  What they don’t mention is the family member who had it had a poor diet and lifestyle!  Those things are related!

The Problem with Mainstream Cancer Treatment

Chemo drugs and other treatments are all poison.  Many studies show that survival rates are not really increased, because a side effect of cancer treatments is…more cancer.  People may not die of the original cancer, but they may die of the chemo treatments or an additional cancer.  The younger a person is at the time of diagnosis and treatment, the more likely an additional cancer is.

Increased mammography is bad, as I mentioned above.  There was a study done where two groups of women were randomly assigned to either get a mammogram every year, or every six years.  It was theorized that, at the end of six years, the cancer rates should be the same in both groups (although the “every six years” group could potentially show more advanced cancers).  However, the group receiving mammograms yearly showed a stastically significant increase in cancer rates.  The theory is two-fold: one, that the increased mammograms were actually causing cancer; and two, that yearly mammograms diagnosed extremely early-stage breast cancer that may have regressed on its own (which does happen).

The real problem is, cancer can never be cured through finding genetic links, increasing screening, and finding new poisons with which to treat it.  That is not a cure!  There is no mention of ways to prevent cancer, such as eating healthier diets (even though new studies saying “broccoli prevents cancer!” “blueberries prevent cancer!” and so on are coming out constantly).  The real research is just not there.  It’s all about detection and drugs.  Even detection is not helping.  That is only finding cancers that already exist.

The true cancer cure lies in preventing it in the first place.  There is no real research being done in this area.  Yes, they say “eating X food prevents cancer!” but they do not really understand why.  Nor will they ever recommend a diet solely of whole foods for cancer prevention.  The vast majority of cancers could be prevented by changing our diet and lifestyle.

To sum it up, I refuse to support “cure cancer” foundations for these reasons:

  • Overpayment of top-level salaries; less money to research
  • Misguided research (money to screenings and poison; not prevention)
  • Ill-chosen partnerships

So no, I will not “Race for the Cure.”  I will not participate, I will not donate, I will not be involved.  I will cringe internally whenever I hear people talking about this.

In the mean time, I will be seeking my whole foods lifestyle in hopes of preventing cancer.  Should I be unlucky enough to get it anyway (yes, I do think some people “just get it,” but it’s a lot more rare than you think!), I will be doing research on natural cancer cures: they are out there.  No, I don’t think I’m tempting the fates by writing this.  No, I don’t look down on families who choose conventional treatment: I think most are scared and honestly don’t know another way.  Yes, I believe our bodies can heal themselves, even of something as big as cancer!

Do you support “cure cancer” foundations?  Why or why not?

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134 Comments

  1. Agreed! My other pet peeve about cancer (cures) is having children be poster children for the cause – way to use children to collect money for a bogus project!!

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  2. Kate – I completely agree with this post, and I'm so glad you wrote it. I wrote one similar to this back in May of this year, and I did get great feedback about it. I think what you'll find is that the more you talk about this topic, the more you find that people do agree (but are too afraid to voice their opinion), and when you start pointing out the issues with fundraising and how misdirected the money is, they really do start to understand how the system of fundraising for more medication and surgeries is simply not the answer. Our entire health system is geared toward and functions as a reactive way of dealing with health problems. There is a lot of talk about prevention and doing things to keep ourselves healthy, but that is really all just talk and no action. Prevention to the modern health communities involves cutting out healthy fats, eating lots of grains and vegetables (which cause massive amounts of mal-absorption, indigestion, and inflammation in the body), and using preventative screenings like mammograms and colonoscopies. And those things don't work! If they did, we'd see disease rates going down. But they aren't. People somehow like to do the same thing and expect different results, I guess. But that's why it's up to us to help and educate, and inform, and get the word out. Keep up the great work Kate! I appreciate you! 🙂

    Here is my article:

    http://www.agriculturesociety.com/?p=4442

    http://www.agriculturesociety.com/?p=4442

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  3. To be perfectly honest, I try to avoid anything big Cure Foundation related, mostly for the same reasons you do. To some extent, it's just frustration on my part. I got frustrated a few years ago when I was trying to purchase some light pink fleece, with either flowers or butterflies on it for a friend's new baby blanket. In going through the entire store's fleece, I could not find a single bolt with flowers or butterflies that didn't also have the Susan G. Komen ribbon on it. I didn't think that would be appropriate – congratulations on your new baby girl…here's a visual reminder that you or she could end up with cancer? Really? I had to go with a pink fleece that had a light silver sparkle in the background, which worked, but the entire room was flowers and butterflies. NOT breast cancer.

    I hate that these foundations have become like the mafia. You WILL support them. I can't buy yeast at my store without buying a pack that has the ribbon on it. The only reason I can get yogurt without supporting them is because I don't buy yogurt at my American store. I don't mind supporting them…IF I choose to. I don't want everything out there to force me to support whatever the cause of the day is.

    I also agree that no research for a true cure is being done. Chemo and radiation treatments are NOT cures. They are medicines to treat symptoms, nothing more. They really aren't different than cough medicine or pain relievers. They don't treat the CAUSE , they treat the EFFECT.

    That being said, I would support foundations that do research a cure. There has been a bit of talk lately about how some brain cancers are being treated by a combination of a patient's own tumor cells to get the patient's immune system to target the cancer. They call it a vaccine, but I don't think that's the right word for it – vaccines are supposed to prevent, not treat. So don't stop reading just because of the word vaccine…mentally replace it with medicine, or treatment, and be happy that at least someone is trying to cure cancers, not just break down the body's defenses while killing both healthy and cancerous cells. http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/03/04/vaccine.brain.cancer/index.html

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  4. I agree with you, but would go a step further and point out that unfortunately cancer is big business. Cancer treatments and diagnostic tools equal big money for companies and sadly they are not looking out for your best interest, but rather are seeking to make the most profit.

    Kevin Trudeau's books and website, naturalcures.com, go into detail about this.

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  5. I don't support foundations like that because of the salaries and waste (same reason I don't support march of dimes), but there is a cancer hospital that my family supports and hopefully I can support too soon. It is called MD Anderson, and all their treatment is free. They charge your insurance if you have it, but the patient doesn't have to pay anything if they can't afford it. It is absolutely an amazing place; good for the patients and incredibly peaceful and supportive for the families.

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  6. There's an interesting article on page 144 of Oprah (yes, I actually subscribe, enjoy, and read the magazine) that discusses the flaws in doing actual breast cancer research (most are done on mice) and how we need to study and follow actual human women to shift the focus of research from treatment to prevention. Dr. Susan Love organized a online forum to find women willing to participate in studies as the roadblock to using humans for studies is that they are hard to find and organize. Duh… welcome to the internet age people. Thank goodness someone is willing to find a different way. They're working on a project called Health of Women to track one million women over 20 years to gather information about diet, exercise, alcohol intake, etc to see what links they can establish with breast cancer. So, there IS some good news out there even when the big research foundations are just playing around.

    Liesel

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  7. MD Anderson will go so far to offer their "free treatment" that they will take your children from you and force them on the children, separating families. Beware of anything that is "free". Google Katie Wernecke and see just how peaceful and supportive they were to this family. Cancer is big business.

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  8. THANK YOU for writing this. Its pinkwashing season and I am so disheartened by having to explain and re-explain the reasons why I do not support Komen and anything pink ribbon. Glad to know others feel the same.

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  9. Amen! I just told my husband yesterday that I am dreading pink month in October. No, I've never had breast cancer. But it seems companies that give a certain portion of their profit are just exploiting people who have had cancer. It's all a great marketing scheme. If they feel so intensely about it, how about not limiting how much the company will donate?

    Further, I just generally dislike foundations in general. To me, it is much less personal and a great way to make people feel like they're doing something or donating, when the money would be better spent going directly to a loved one, neighbour, friend, with cancer.

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  10. What a great article. When you write pieces like this, it really sets you apart from most blogs.
    Almost every other womens blog I have come across champions the misguided, albeit well intentioned fight against cancer.
    Anyway, I agree with you 100 percent. I was disgusted when I found out how much of the donations go to pharmaceutical companies so they can concoct more drug potions to hawk to the public.

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  11. I applaude you for writing this. I completely agree with you.

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  12. I'm a 30 yr old breast cancer survivor. I was diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer when I was 25 and pregnant with our 4th child. While I totally understand your stance on the pink ribbon I must disagree slightly. I believe that anything that might raise awareness of breast cancer is a great thing. I always thought that breast cancer was an older woman disease. The age group that has the highest death rate is 18-35 because we don't think it can happen to us!!
    I also have to say if it weren't for chemo i'd be dead. I wish I would've known more about nutrition at my time of diagnosis but I didn't –there also wasn't much time for research as my tumor was larger than a softball. Now i know t hat the cure can be worse than the disease because I now have congestive heart failure from one of the chemo drugs. If my cancer were to ever come back I would have to go an alternative route. However many women cannot afford the whole alternative route due to insurance not covering that.( i was blessed to have all of my treatments and surgeries completely paid for.)

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  13. Thanks so much for writing this. I have never bought products with that "pink ribbon" because most of them CAUSE cancer. It has always made me cringe too. Great post!

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  14. While I agree that you make several valid points about business choices and such, I do have to point out that nothing can be "cured" overnight. It takes MANY MANY years of expensive research to cure something and the things that have developed out of the research were most likely "accidents" in the quest to find a cure. While they may all be "mainstream medicine", the majority of the people in this country place their trust in modern medicine and THAT also is not going to be changed overnight. Medicinal advancement has to take place because the majority of those people are going to go that route. Alternative "treatments" have also been developed over time for "nauralists" to use. It is good to offer treatments that all sorts of people are going to choose to turn to. BUT, my main point is that all of these "non-cures" take place on the journey to find a cure, so while it may not be an actual cure, it shows that they are working and they are making some findings related to an eventual "cure".

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  15. I do agree with you, although my reasons for never supporting the pink ribbon products was for different, more personal reasons (lung cancer caused my grandmother's, uncle's and father's death, my mother has been blessed to be a 9 year survivor of lung cancer – so the overwhelming breast cancer support is frustrating, when lung cancer is more deadly than breast cancer, more women die from lung cancer than breast cancer) but this article has informed me even more, and I appreciate that! Knowledge is power 🙂

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  16. Beth, some might argue that there already is a "cure" for cancer. Kris Carr is keeping her rare for of cancer stable and living a healthy life (please google her if you're not familiar with who she is).

    I wish there were much MORE emphasis on prevention. I get tired of hearing about "awareness." You would have to be living in a cave to not be aware of breast cancer.

    Angela, so sorry about your family's losses. Lung cancer (and heart disease) should take more precedence over breast cancer (in my opinion), but breast cancer is the "popular" disease. And it has those daarrling pink ribbons associated with it 😉

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  17. Such a concise post! Thank you!

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  18. Thanks for this post- I COMPLETELY agree with it! The lack of focus on real prevention of cancer is a travesty, as is the refusal to look at nutritional cures for cancer. If anyone reading these comments is looking for an alternative cure for cancer I recommend looking into the Gerson Therapy and RBTI- Reams Biological Theory of Ionization.

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  19. I agree with you. In so many years of research, there was hardly any progress in finding a cure for anything. I wonder if there is any valid reason why we support the big foundation like, "March of dimes" I wonder if the head ceo get a nice chunk of all the donations? Its sad but this is the world we live in.

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  20. I don't support them either but I have never given it much thought before reading this. I guess I have always felt that the key to cancer is prevention and eating well. I have a friend who worked with a woman in NY who has been treating cancer with foods for years, successfully too. Yet the medical establishment won't touch this because you can't patent food! So for as much as I feel for the people who get cancer, I don't support the way society promotes finding the cure. Great post. I love something that gets me thinking!

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  21. Nice to see someone else who agrees with me and so many comments as well. You may be interested in some research done and published about people who unexpectedly survived what should have been terminal illness. There is info about this and other cancer issues on my http://www.cancerremedies.org/ site. Until this research was published no one had come up with a list of the psycho-social – cultural attributes of survivors and how they fit together.

    Denz-Penhey, H, Murdoch JC. Personal resiliency: serious diagnosis and prognosis with unexpected quality outcomes. Qualitative Health Research 2008;18:391-404.

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  22. Absolutely agreed!!!! Thank you for yet another great post!!

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  23. I agree with this post 100%! I found out the truth of cancer foundations from reading the Natural Cures book by Kevin Trudeau about 3 years ago. In the book he says something along the lines of even if someone found a real cure for all types of cancer they (they being pharmaceutical companies & cancer foundations) wouldnt want the cure to be revealed to the public because hundreds of thousands of jobs would be lost! It all comes down to being about the money, sadly enough! I wish people werent so greedy for money and actually want to help people to get rid of cancer all together by being proactive in making better food choices, etc.

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  24. Greatly enjoyed your article.

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  25. What an interesting article!! I also do not support "find a cure for cancer" organizations. I honestly do not believe that these companies can find a cure anyway. Cancer cells are present in everyones body naturally anyway & our immune system fights them successfully normally but when you get cancer, it is because the cells multiply so quickly they overwhelm your immune system. I believe it has a lot to do with our eating habits & what we are putting on/in our bodies. I also believe that the only way we can find a cure for cancer, is if God supplies us with that cure & no amount of money will make that happen.

    I lost my mom very suddenly in April. My perfectly healthy mom went into hospital for a routine operation, only to be told she had terminal gall bladder cancer & there was nothing they could do. She died very quickly at the age of 51. I found your blog as I am trying to improve the way my family eats.

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  26. All good points! I just want to mention a note regarding the issue of compensation (and this is not an opinion but a reality that faces non-profits): It would be hard to attract top talent to run your business, however, if the foundation was not competitively compensating the employees. That's a fact of life for most Non-Profits, and why many of them fail – due to lack of funding for their activities (compensation included). I agree that the money should be conservatively spent, however why should a high-skilled executive work for a non-profit if a for-profit company is offering them $200,000 more? Actually, non-profit companies are trying hard to find ways to offer better incentives to attract top talent, and their salaries will likely be increasing in the future to match for-profit companies. But this is supposed to mean that non-profits start performing better as they have more skilled leaders as well… so we'll see about that!!

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  27. Amy, unless she has been deemed fully cancer-free, she hasn't been "cured". She may be asymptomatic, but not "cured".

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  28. I fully support these foundations and I Race for the Cure every year. My mom had breast cancer in her early 30s and the research of these foundations helped her survive. She had a healthy diet and exercised regularly, but she still got cancer. If she hadn't gotten early mammograms, the cancer wouldn't have been found and she'd be dead.

    It's really easy to slam organizations that you have no personal connections with. It's easy to belittle the policies of a presidential candidate, complain about the public school system, etc. But until you've actually been in these situations (had a loved one or yourself have cancer, run for president, be in charge of public schools) I wouldn't assume you know all the answers. Chances are somebody has thought of your ideas before, but they don't work.

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  29. Claire,

    I'm sorry to hear that your mom had breast cancer, but happy that she is a survivor!

    I am opposed to this foundation because it is NOT really searching for a cure. And yes, I had a family member (aunt) with breast cancer too. There are plenty of other people in the comments who've had family members with cancer and/or themselves had cancer who do NOT support these foundations also.

    The truth is, drugs and poisons CANNOT cure cancer. They can make it go away, at the expense of your overall health (making your body weak and sick, destroying your immune system). Prevention is the ONLY answer. Healthy diet WILL prevent cancer in almost all cases, but what most people think is healthy is not. If you are new here (I suspect you are), please look around for awhile. There is a lot to read about what people think is healthy, and what is really healthy. I'm betting your mom was eating the way doctors tell her is healthy — right? Maybe if you both can get more information now on a truly healthy diet, you can prevent any further cancer!

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  30. You have valid points about the business/crookedness, completely accurate. But where I am different in all of this is-I see it as a "Hope" and not just a "research cause" but a "cause for Hope." For those suffering or who have lost someone to a disease, this is their support, their "family" of sorts, yes-it's become a very crooked business, but I'm glad it's there, as one of these comments said-Anything that raises awareness is awesome because if you, as a woman, should see pink and immediately connect it with Breast Cancer Awareness then Komen for the Cure has made a difference, because that reminder may lead you to the doctor's appointment that finds cancer early and is able to be treated, or not. Does that make sense? I do not disagree with your arguments-but I disagree with the lack of empathy for those who are/have/may never but don't want to-suffer, I don't care if 2 cents of my money is actually going to the research, I know my donations are making this group of amazing, supportive people-showing great empathy and compassion for complete strangers, grow, and grow, and I don't see how that can be a bad thing. The world needs more supporters and less over-analyzers. I don't mean that to be offensive-I just think compassion is a really powerful thing and can do a world of good for someone who needs it. In my eyes if the money I donate doesn't even go to research(yes it's crooked, but)and it is going to growing this group of people who pray their hearts out for others and pray for a cure, I am very happy to see that money go to that cause. Guess I'll just consider it supporting a great congregation of prayer warriors, and I'll wear my pink proudly.

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  31. Amber,

    I understand what you're saying. And I absolutely think that people who are, will, or have faced cancer need a support group. I think the whole country needs to be supportive and open about ways to truly prevent and cure cancer! I still don't support these groups officially because although they function as a support group to many, that is NOT their real purpose. Their real purpose is, honestly, to provide FALSE hope. They promise "we can help get rid of cancer" yet they are doing nothing of the sort. I'd rather see small groups spring up that can provide REAL hope, REAL help, and REAL support.

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  32. No, I do not support them. I have felt the same as you for years. Every time I see these campaigns I feel sick. My mother passed away in June from a rare form of cancer after succumbing to mainstream medicine. She had no money left to pay for her natural treatments; what a tragedy. What the chemo did to her was beyond belief, and the hardest thing I have ever had to witness. I don't want anyone to have to watch their loved one be poisoned to death by these sick greedy "doctors". A few days before she passed she said she learned her lesson. I wish she would have taken my advice, but the "doctors" convinced her. The truth (actual research) is 90% of people live longer who do not take the chemo.

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  33. My chiropractor told me that we all "catch" cancer at least once a month.
    What keeps it from developing?
    A healthy immune system.

    It's the prevention that will eradicate cancer, not the yet-to-be-discovered cure.

    Keep up the whole foods lifestyle!
    It will save us all :-p

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  34. Oh my heavenly word.
    This was fantastic. You said everything I have felt for the last thirty years and I thought I was the only one so I kept it to myself! I have never had anyone understand this position. I have felt this way since back in the 1970's when The American Cancer Society was the big dog. These groups make money off cancer not off of curing cancer. Curing cancer would put them out of business. Countless millions of dollars have been given to them and they are no where closer to curing anything. I would like to see some statistics since it sure seems like the rate of people getting cancer and dying from "cancer" (or really the "cure") is higher than ever.

    Thanks for writing this!

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  35. I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the studies that show oral contraceptives in the water supply.
    http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=42520

    There are also studies that link oral contraceptive use and cancer
    http://www.newsinferno.com/health-concerns/birth-control-pill-cancer-link-debated/
    http://www.bcpinstitute.org/publishedpapers.htm

    There have also been many studies that have found that long-term breastfeeding dramatically decreases a woman's chances of getting breast cancer.
    http://www.naturalnews.com/028469_brstfeeding_brst_cancer.html

    "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." Ben Franklin

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  36. Wow. I never knew that exposure to conventional cancer treatment increased your risk for subsequent cancer. That makes me so sad. My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was in her late 30s (pre-menopausal) and had a radical mastectomy (butchering in those days!!), radiation AND chemo. She was "cured" (no relapse in 5 years), but was later diagnosed with, and died from, kidney cancer when she was only 47. That was 19 years ago, and I really miss her.
    I've never been comfortable with the whole "cure cancer" foundations, but couldn't really put my finger on exactly why. Your post nails it. Thank you.
    Ashley

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  37. I completely agree with you, Kate. I stopped giving money to any conventional medical foundations like American Cancer or American Heart etc. When they start focusing on prevention, including cleaning up the environment, maybe I'll reconsider giving. It's food, it's lifestyle, and it's the environment. Period. It's not how often you're screened or taking prophylactic drugs. Glad that the people here get that. We are not popular with our views, but speaking the truth as we see it is critical. Thank you.

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  38. My mother is a naturopathic doctor. She got breast cancer 2 years ago and it had already spread to alot of the surrounding tissues and lymph nodes. She went to Italy and was treated by Dr. Simoncini. He hooked up a port to her armpit area and injected baking soda and water solution twice a day. The weekly ultra sound pictures were amazing. It shrunk every single week, and in 5 weeks and 2 days was completely gone. He sent her home on a strict anti-candida diet, as his theory is that all cancer is caused by Candida Albincans (which i agree with). She is in perfect health today, eating a whole foods sugar/gluten free diet..
    Dr. Simoncinis website is http://WWW.CANCERISAFUNGUS.COM He is an amazing man, and all this money being wasted on american cancer research, should be given to him!

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  39. What a great testimonial, Heather H. So great that your mother is healthy!

    My aunt was cured of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma with naturopathic treatments at a clinic in Idaho. Her cancer was not found early and she was very very sick. It took a couple years of treatments and she is now the healthiest she has ever been. She continues to be completely cancer free and this is confirmed with regular testing with an M.D.

    What's funny is the underwhelming response by her M.D. and others in her life who know this history and don't rush their cancer patients to this clinic. You would think people who want to know more or research it more when there are people recovering without the conventional treatments.

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  40. Thank you for posting this. I read another article that was similar (I think it was the one on Ag. Society) and it opened my eyes. Your article is point-on. My grandmother died from cancer. It started as breast cancer, and then spread to every major organ in her body. I saw what the conventional treatments did to her and was heart-broken, having to see her go through it. She dreaded every time she had to go. Unfortunately, she passed away 3 years ago. I do not support these foundations and won't, until they make some major changes. I personally know someone who found out he had cancer and changed his lifestyle (radically), including his diet, and has been cancer free for over 15 years without "treatment".

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  41. As a breast cancer survivor (I was 35 when diagnosed with very aggressive breast cancer – no family history, extremely healthy diet and lifestyle, nursed all my kids over a year, etc.), I agree with you on some points, but have to say I completely disagree on others. I don't support organizations claiming to raise money for research because of the mishandling of the funds, so I definitely agree with your stance on this. However, if you don't personally know people who have tried to "treat" their cancer with alternative medicine (diet and supplements), then you really can't be telling people that it works. IT DOESN'T WORK!! I have a very close friend who is dying right now because she believed the lie that diet and supplements (completely raw/vegan diet) would "cure" her. She felt great for years, but at the same time, the cancer was growing and spreading throughout her body. This is just one example of many. It is irresponsible to tell people that chemo is poison and is, therefore, bad for you. OF COURSE IT'S POISON! BUT IT DOESN'T KILL YOU – CANCER DOES! If I had not had chemo (along with massive numbers of others I personally know), I would be dead. Secondary cancers are not caused by chemo, although they can be caused by radiation. I wish you would have distinguished between PREVENTING and CURING. Preventing cancer with diet and a healthy lifestyle is possible, although not a guarantee. However, curing cancer is only possible with early intervention, traditional treatment, AND diet and a healthy lifestyle, which keeps you strong while enduring the effects of treatment.

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  42. Funny how lots of people seem to know someone who changed their diet/used natural treatments, and they worked! Why does our society need a "scientific cure" or a pill to fix it? Just because its simple dosent mean it wont work. "by small and simple things, shall great things come to pass"

    I get sick of all the pink during the month…such a scam.

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  43. Stephanie,

    I'm sorry to hear you had cancer, but great that you survived!

    Natural/alternative methods CAN cure cancer. There are many books, articles and testimonials documenting this! Read some of the other comments on this post and you'll see people who shared that they or a family member WERE cured using natural methods. It's not as simple as "just eat better" at that point, obviously; you need much more aggressive means. But to say that "only traditional medicine can cure cancer" is just wrong. I believe there are some cases where the cancer is so aggressive that you may need to go for traditional medicine initially to slow it enough to explore other alternatives, but in many cases, alternative medicine is as successful, if not more successful, and without the horrendous side effects.

    I understand that your experience has been that conventional medicine was necessary, but that is NOT everyone's experience. And it is NOT the only way. Natural means show much promise too.

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  44. I'm surprised no one noted how underhanded the solicitation of these donations is. You are often asked in a public realm, and are forced to tell another individual "no", as if you are "anti-cure". I mean, seriously, forcing cashiers to ask people to donate towards breast cancer research? That's just backhanded, IMO. People often say "yes" simply because they are embarassed or feel awkward saying "no". I was once asked to donate at a CVS (I don't remember the foundation). I asked if the cashier had any information on the foundation (a pamphlet, website, whatever) so that I could look into how the funding was spent, what the aims of the foundation were, etc and donate on my next visit if I wished. The employee had no idea. She didn't even know the name of the actual foundation! Not to mention that companies often give incentives for their employees to get a certain amount of donations. I know that at a previous restaurant where I worked, we were actually PUNISHED if we didn't get a certain amount of donations. Ridiculous. And the companies that are partnered with these foundations often do it for PR (it makes them look philanthropic). Really, the whole exercise loses its true meaning.

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  45. I am so glad you wrote this. Everything you say resonates with me, and much of it was new information but made absolute sense. My mother is a leukemia survivor. Over the years I have had so many phone calls asking me to support cancer cures of all kinds – I told them all – no, sorry – I will not – and then I tell them why – I tell them that if we put more money and effort into educating the masses on the direct effect organic farming, local and sustainable farming, WHAT YOU EAT and WHAT YOU INHALE, and WHAT OVER-PRESCRIBED PHARMACEUTICALS all have on our mental, physical and emotional health and well-being, we would see a decrease in cancer illnesses – no doubt about it.. You just have to walk into a SAFEWAY or similar store and with your eyes you see brightly packaged foods and with your nose you smell something either masquerading as a tempting food or a medley of artificial ingredients and packaging. My mother always ate homecooked food and I am pretty sure much of it when she was a child, was the original organic – however, through the 70's and on, I know that in amongst her pots and pans were plenty of non-sticks and alluminums and when she got her microwave when they first came out – it was enormous – in her tiny kitchen, I have no doubt that every time she used it she was radiating herself. Go figure. So I don't donate to these causes and I don't run in their fun runs or whatever – I support local sustainability, local environmentally-friendly practices and non-profits and I try to walk my talk as much as possible. Thank you for raising awareness – people think everything can be 'fixed' with drugs – there is a place for research and there is a place for drugs and allopathic medicine, but preventative medicine and nutrition should be a fundamental part of every medical practitioner's education.

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  46. AMEN! I thought I was the pink scrooge!! I refuse to support anything where people have become a herd of animals senselessly following the leader without questioning the motives or end. I support grassroots activism until it becomes a big business and then move on to where I'm needed…

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  47. As an herbalist, I agree wholeheartedly with everything you've said. I was a bit disappointed that you didn't include the Planned Parenthood link to Susan B. Komen. Very disturbing link, I believe.

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  48. My mom goes to church with a lady who actually got a mastectomy because she was in a high at risk category when they discovered she had the gene! I told her that was the worst idea I've ever heard. Glad you wrote this. I do not support all the pink, I think its a mainstream bandwagon people jump on and feel guilted into. Thank you for speling out for me so clearly what I already felt inky heart. Love your blog.

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  49. I totally agree with your post! However, how do you compassionatley decline when it's a friend or acquaintance asking and that person is a cancer survivor? That's been happening to me and I don't know how to say why I won't contribute without sounding harsh.

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  50. I just wanted to say that our close family friend was recently diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer, about 6 months ago, that hat metasticised into her bones. She had 4 and 5 inch long tumors removed from both femurs, and several removed from her breasts. She decided she did not want to do chemo or radiation, and visited a naturo-path, who had her radically change her diet. As of this past week, she is cancer free, her only "medicine" having been changing her diet, and it only took 6 months. If that doesn't speak for its self, nothing will.

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  51. I totally agree with the financial aspects of foundations and good grief, I mean why do people need to make over $100, 000/yr. My 4 person family in SAN DIEGO (Ca is expensive) somehow lives on less than $50,000.
    I have always had an issue with the survival of the fittest. Man's research and drugs and whatnot had led to disease being allowed to continue on through the generations instead of being weeded out. I know that this is controversial. We have some good friends who have MS, CF, cancer and other ailments. I would not wish for them to not be here because of their sickness, but Man has been trying to play God for some time now.
    I just don't know where I stand on medical intervention. But I know if my child had something, as long as their quality of life would be good I would do everything I could to keep them alive.

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    • Kate,
      The same could be said of several non’profit, organizations. I am skeptical when I get the calls to raise money to purchase safety items for firemen, or to help children with cancer. We really do not know unless we research. Thank you for researching. We do need to have more money go into actual research, and not just debunk the natural cures because they are not Main Stream, expensive, Pharmaceutical cures.
      Thank you again for the research and sharing.
      Debbie

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  52. I totally agree with you! (Thank you for linking to this article in your recent post.) Have you read any research about the link between breastfeeding and lowered risk of breast cancer? I have read some interesting things about how the culture's shift to working moms who aren't breastfeeding is related to an increase in breast cancer. And the fact that Komen donates to Planned Parenthood makes me want to gag. They say the money is going to help for breast screenings, etc but who really knows?

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  53. This is such a great post. I've considered writing something similar on my blog. Did you know that Susan G Komen financially supports Planned Parenthood also!? THey give them money for mamograms, not abortions…in my opinion that is one of the worst things they could do especially with the huge association between abortions and breast cancer rates.

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  54. I so agree!!! I cringe when I see all the advertisements for Komen and all those other cancer organizations. I refuse to buy "pink washed" products on principle. When someone asks me to donate, I tell them "I'm not interested" and generally just walk away (most do NOT want to hear the truth about these organizations so why bother). Every great once in a while, someone will actually want to know why I don't support cancer research and I explain why. They are generally horrified to find out all of that as they had no idea it was such a profit driven industry that really doesn't care about the people it's supposed to be helping. Don't get me wrong. I know there are some incredibly caring (and sadly brainwashed by the industry) folks who work in the cancer industry. But the industry itself doesn't care about people. That's been proven over and over, including by the suppression of information (or rather ATTEMPTS to suppress information) about preventing cancer as well as treating it naturally and without chemo/radiation.

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  55. I think if you had ever been close to anyone who’s had cancer (in my case, my mother, grandmother, sister-in-law, mother-in-law, and cousin), you wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss chemo, drugs or screening tests. The only reason many of these people are still alive (and cancer-free) today is because they had good early screening and access to drugs. We have only to look at Steve Jobs to see what happens when cancer is left to ‘holistic’ cures.

    And I really think you need to speak to a geneticist before you dismiss research into finding the genes that lead to cancer. It’s only been a few years since we’ve mapped the human genome, so it is far too early to assess what we’ve learned, and what we will learn, about the genetics of cancer. Keep in mind that cancer isn’t really one ‘disease’, anyway – cancer is just the name we give to the process whereby certain cells in our body start reproducing incorrectly. If there was a single external cause (or even multiple external causes) that invariably ’caused’ cancer, we’d know it by now. Why do some people smoke for years but never get lung cancer, while other people who’ve never smoked get lung cancer at age 42? The difference is in their genetics.

    And your assertion that “there is no real research going into preventing cancer” is patently not true. There are all kinds of studies going on ALL THE TIME regarding cancer prevention – including assessing things like nutrition. Here’s just one example: http://www.cancer.org/Research/ResearchProgramsFunding/cancer-prevention-study-overviews

    As for funding research, and paying the best and brightest to do it: Frankly, if they have to pay larger salaries in order to attract the best minds to work for cancer prevention, cure or treatment, then I’m fine with that. Most of the people who’ve made great advances for humanity have not been motivated by altruism anyway – they’re motivated by intellectual curiosity, the desire to change the world, even fame and fortune. And that’s okay, too – this blog wouldn’t exist if people like Bill Gates and, again, Steve Jobs, hadn’t been motivated by their own intellectual curiosity and quest for a little fame and fortune.

    If you really believe that “the vast majority of cancers could be prevented by changing our diet and lifestyle,” I urge you to conduct some clinical trials which prove it, because who wouldn’t rather eat blueberries and broccoli rather than having to undergo chemo? However, I think that if it were really that simple, we’d know it already – and we wouldn’t have had cancers showing up 250, 1000, 2000+ years ago when we were, presumably, eating a healthier diet and living a simpler lifestyle.

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    • Well put, Sarah. Totally agree with you!

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      • You don’t have to ask her to prove that blueberries and broccoli prevent cancer. It’s a known fact that eating healthy is what your body needs. America has the highest rate EVER of all countries for cancer, and we eat worse than any other country in the world. Many forms of currently known cancers weren’t even heard of centuries ago. As our country evolves into worse and worse unhealthy eating lifestyles, the more cancer and disease spread.

        (also, just to note, I am not coming against anyone personally who has had cancer or been through that horrifying experience. I have had close friends fight the fight and lose their life bc of it and I am in no way putting a blame on anyone.) I just wish so badly our country would go back to eating healthier in general instead of eating out of convenience. The closer to the ground it is, the healthier it is for our bodies! 🙂

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      • The China Study is the largest body of research on diet and disease published to date. The main conclusion was that a plant based diet prevents 99% of “Western Diseases” (i.e. heart disease, diabetes, cancer, etc.). So, yes, eating “blueberries and broccoli” will do more to prevent cancer than any drug or other lifestyle choice. That said, prevention is the key. “Blueberries and broccoli” probably wouldn’t be a very good treatment for cancer – by then, it may be too late.

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        • Hi Daron,

          The China Study has been thoroughly debunked so I don’t count that as evidence. And no, simply eating “blueberries and broccoli” wouldn’t treat cancer. An entire lifestyle shift is required. Cancer occurs because the body is toxic and unable to clear itself. Using strong drugs to just ‘kill it all’ actually has very low survival rates for many forms and comes with serious side effects, including other types of cancer. Working to naturally detox the body and restore it to health helps it resolve cancer on its own. And I say this now…after a good friend was recently diagnosed. It is what she is doing and I trust and support her.

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    • I have family members who had cancer — two of my aunts. So there’s that.

      Steve Jobs did a combination of raw vegan (which is not what I believe is the optimal diet) and drugs. In fact, I believe he used drugs, then tried to do a “holistic” approach, but his body was too damaged to actually fight back. That’s a really poor example.

      As another said, we don’t need to prove that healthy foods prevent cancer. Did 50% of people 2000+ years ago have cancer? Or even 100 years ago? Not even close. There was always an odd person with cancer, but I believe that in 1 in 10,000 cases (or something like that) it just happens. But when the cancer rate is 50% and has increased sharply as we’ve moved away from eating natural foods and have increased the toxicity in our lives, it’s pretty clear what’s going on. We don’t need to fund a bunch of expensive studies to prove it when we have common sense. I mean…do you even realize how serious it is when 50% of people will have cancer in their lifetimes? That’s bad!

      So, no, I don’t agree with you. At all. I stand by what I said.

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    • I agree, Sarah! Thank you for putting the other side out there! I could go on and on, but you said it very well.

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    • Sarah,
      I had 3 people in my family who had cancer, my aunt, great-grandma and my mother. Both my mom and my aunt refused medical treatments and decided to go the alternative way and both beat cancer. When my mom’s diagnosis (skin cancer) came in the doctor actually started laughing, yes laughing non stop saying she wont go anywhere now. For many years that laughter rang in her ears. When she came back a year later that same doctor could not believe his own eyes. Cancer was gone. She never told him what she did.
      I do believe that if your time came no amount of alternative care, chemo or any other treatments will help.

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  56. My grandfather died of leukemia in 1995. Several of my uncles have also battled some form of cancer. My brother developed a large brain tumor (non-cancerous) when he was 19. My best friend’s mother was diagnosed with breast cancer several years ago. I am familiar with holistic treatments, chemotherapy, radiation, and everything else that goes along with these diseases. For myself, it is not the question of whether or not chemotherapy or holistic cancer treatments are effective. I believe they both have been proven to be effective for certain people. However, I do agree with Kate and would rather not give my money to these cancer organizations that are so heavily influenced by Big Pharma and the FDA. I believe in these organizations’ mission statements, but do not believe that they are on a quest to find a true cure. Several of the drugs given in chemotherapy today are those that were invented back in the 70’s and 80’s. If we have funded all this money to the cancer society and foundations for the sole purpose of finding a cure and making progress in the treatment of cancer, then why are we still using drugs that were approved by the FDA back in 1987? Why haven’t we discovered a cancer treatment without all of the negative side effects. Well, actually, we have. Rather, Dr. Burzynski has. Look up the movie, “Burzynski, The Movie.” It is now available on netflix. It is the disturbing tale of this wonderful doctor who has made a huge discovery in the treatment of cancer, yet has been bullied by the FDA for almost three decades now. Yes, that is correct. He discovered and patented these proteins called Antineoplastons. They have been proven effective to treat cancer, especially childhood brainstem glioma, which has been noted as an incurable form of terminal cancer. However, this form of treatment has been kept from the general public because Big Pharma and the FDA are not happy with an individual owning the right to manufacture and sell this medicine to the open market. Why? Because the pharmaceutical industry will not be able to dip her greedy fingers in this medicine’s profits. It is unfortunate that the industry has taken control of so many aspects of our lives. I would like to support cancer organizations and foundations, however, I know that they are heavily impacted by the national cancer associations that have taken many questionable actions in the case against Dr. Burzynski, and that is unsettling for me.

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  57. Kate, thank you for this post. I have felt this way ever since reading Nourishing Traditions, but felt like a heretic among my friends, all of whom “Race for the Cure” and ask for donations each year. I just quietly decline and keep my opinions to myself. However, you have given me the courage to share what I’ve learned about cancer prevention if someone ever questions my decision.

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  58. A subject with multiple issues, concerns, fears and agendas. Personally, I believe in giving directly to research institutes not to organizations that are a layer between you, the donor, and the research itself. I do have several self-interests here – I work for a nonprofit medical research institute that does basic biomedical research, including for cancer. One thing I’ve learned since working here (since 2004) is that by first studying what healthy looks like (healthy cells, organs, genes, etc), then scientists can truly learn and understand about the non healthy ones – because good diagnostics is the first key. Next, the human body is very complex and wonderfully made, a true gift from God. The interdependence is amazing, so a narrow, simple answer usually doesn’t exist. The best approach in research is usually multifold – diagnostics, treatments and, hopefully, cures for those with disease and then prevention for others. All deserve the best research and treatment possible.

    At my institute, we’re fortunate as 100% of all money donated goes directly to research; there is a trust that pays for all admin cost. Paying for the best and brightest is worth it. The scientists deserve to be well compensated (not going to argue amounts), but are primarily motivated by making a positive difference.

    Sadly, the average Rx takes 15 years and over $800 million dollars to go from bench to bedside. The constant balance is between safety and effectiveness. My mother’s life was saved by having an annual mammogram, but the chemo definitely had negative side effects. Of course, prevention is key, but let us not overlook those for whom prevention is too late.

    Regarding the marketing issue – I repeat, more bang is received for your buck if you can / will donate directly to the organization that actually does the research. But I appreciate the increased awareness such marketing brings. Reminds me of all those school fundraisers – I prefer to donate time/money directly rather than adding clutter to my home. But in a world of billions of individuals, it takes more than one approach and one option.

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  59. It’s so refreshing to hear your viewpoint on this! Unfortunately most people have their heads in the sand. 🙂

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  60. It has been bugging me how the “Race for the Cure” has grown and over the years how much money have they raised and yet to find a cure. And how about finding prevention instead of a cure. I know many women who have gone through the torment of cancer treatment and it is horrible. There has to be a better way such as Gerson Miracle.

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  61. I get so upset every october with the stupid facebook status. How does displaying my bra color help cure cancer anyway?

    No, I do not support cure cancer foundations either.

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  62. As I watched DH go through surgery for throat cancer (tumor was choking him to death) and end up with a feeding tube, and refuse chemo and radiation, I recalled the many we have known who either died from the treatment (NOT alternative!) or died anyway, suffering greatly through the treatment. I agree with this article completely; if you do real research into the organizations that are “search for the cure” you will see bloated salaries; no, we don’t need to pay the best and the brightest! DH is righting the cancer using alternative methods on his own. I have seen with my own eyes that the cut, poison, and burn philosophy of so-called modern medicine is truly barbaric. It creates more suffering than cures if you look at actual statistics – not the inflated stats they want you to see.

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  63. As I watched DH go through surgery for throat cancer (tumor was choking him to death) and end up with a feeding tube, and refuse chemo and radiation, I recalled the many we have known (including my mother and mother-in-law) who either died from the treatment (NOT alternative!) or died anyway, suffering greatly through the treatment. I agree with this article completely; if you do real research into the organizations that are “search for the cure” you will see bloated salaries; no, we don’t need to pay the best and the brightest! DH is righting the cancer using alternative methods on his own. I have seen with my own eyes that the cut, poison, and burn philosophy of so-called modern medicine is truly barbaric. It creates more suffering than cures if you look at actual statistics – not the inflated stats they want you to see. Dr. Burzynski has done more to advance a cure for cancer than any of the organizations and research facilities and Big Pharma has ever done! Just follow the money and you will get your eyes opened.

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  64. I don’t want to be rude, but I happen to agree with Sarah. Without knowing the science it is a dramatic statement to say chemo is poison and that genetic studies are negatively impacting diagnosis. I’ve been in neuroscience research for a long time (PhD from University of Kentucky) and I’ll be honest that while I don’t outright trust Big Pharma, I do know the science is not that black and white.

    Prevention may be key for a majority in terms of better foods etc being placed in our body, but there are more factors in play. How much a whole foods diet influences genetics isn’t known. So while I agree Americans have a problem with over medication, and over processed unhealthy foods, to lump all medical treatments in with that is irresponsible.

    I understand the frustration with the salaries, however, and agree wholeheartedly. But I would apply this to a lot more people than just this charity.

    All in all, I realize that chemo is there to induce apoptosis and cannot differentiate between healthy and cancerous cells, but that doesn’t mean that it is an worthless treatment. It really means we need to find better more precise treatments, while encouraging a new generation in prevention techniques. Because when you use a blanket statement such as these are poison, or there are no cures , it stops research cold. It promotes an attitude of why investigate? If we are that black and white, we will stagnate, never developing or learning more….and that hurts everyone.

    My apologies, if I was too harsh. I do love whole food diets and the people promoting them. You all help a lot of people, but in this case I had to say my peace. Best wishes to you and your family!

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  65. I agree with you about discrediting certain agencies because of how they spend their money. “Race for the Cure” consistently uses pictures of children in their advertising but gives less than 1% of their research money toward childhood cancer. I also agree with you about whole foods preventing cancer. However, a reality to accept is that whole foods will not TOTALLY prevent cancer. It is in our environment. It is in our soil and air. My 3 year-old had tumors on both kidneys, one of which was large enough to fill her right side. Babies are diagnosed with cancer on a regular basis. If you map out the prevalent areas that childhood cancer occur, which has been done, it is the agricultural heart of the country. We eat organic, we drink filtered water, I breastfeed, but while I was pregnant my neighbors may have sprayed their yard with pesticide…. who knows? The Childrens Oncology Group Foundation money goes directly to the network of over 100 hospitals that develops cures. Chemo is poison. I know this first-hand. But, you ask any of us childhood cancer parents, we would all rather have our child with peripheral neuropathy, with some learning problems, with some digestive problems, than NOT HAVE OUR CHILD. My daughter runs and climbs and draws pictures like any other 1st grader; it’s just taken some PT and OT to get her there. I have cursed the nerve damage that Vincristine left her with, but I embrace the fact that it was available to save her life. Research will lead to better cures for children; they are not little adults, but we give them adult chemo treatments. Childhood cancer needs research money and needs your support.

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  66. Hi
    I just followed this recommendation “Look up the movie, “Burzynski, The Movie.” It is now available on netflix” and watched the movie. Amazing. Mashallah its a wonderful thing and though i worked in as a cancer researcher in a biotech company (genetrix – gone now), as well as at large institutes (dana farber) and medical unis (harvard med and boston med), i NEVER ever heard about this, not even a whisper.
    Everyone and everywhere we were racing to find the cure and no one ever mentioned or alluded to the existence of this cure which was working (25+% complete recovery rate, with no side effects or future problems!).
    I used to fund cancer research and stopped for various reasons, the main one being that no one seems really interested in the cure, they just seem interested in the search for the cure, the discover aspect, but no cure seemed forthcoming and when a potential cure comes up, its funding dries up, its tossed out of the window as quacky or implausible or whatever, or more recently (read 5 years ago now), it gets clogged up with beurocracy and red tape that may take years if not decades to untangle.
    I also want to say that I dont think a healthy diet is the answer for all. I think it definately helps and that less people would ever end up with cancer if we all took care of our bodies properly inshallah (God willing). I also think there are a lot of contributing factors to the development of cancer, from not eating right, eating overly processed and genetically modified foods, not getting enough physical activity, not getting enough physical stimulation and also not enough variety of physical stimulations. i mean nowadays, we have to force ourselves to be active and a person can spend the whole day being a couch potato or extremely sedentary easily.
    I think if there was a way to support the type of research and work people like dr. Burzynsky is doing, that’d be great. His stuff works mashallah so it should be further funded, even if we dont get tax deduction. It would be voting with our dollar and maybe, it will be like the case of organic food, it took a while but you now see it at supermarkets.
    Sorry if its long and rambly, its almost midnight here. Thanks for this thought provoking article and thanks for the responses, especially the guest who wrote about the movie. I have learned something new today and that is always a blessing from the One Most High

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  67. Thanks for finally saying what I think when I see my well meaning good hearted friends support these cancer foundations. I never have the balls to say it though. BUT I will share this article 🙂

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  68. Oh, I’m glad someone finally had the words that I’ve been searching for. My dad was diagnosed with lung cancer, and him and mom had to move in with my husband and myself. When I took my dad to his first radiation appointment, they gave him such a harsh treatment that his skin literally peeled and flaked off and fell to the floor, WHILE he was in the middle of the treatment. I think it really scared him, it sure scared me. After the treatment was done, (it only took 20 mins) I overheard the technician bragging to the resident that he just “scored another $8,500.00 for a 20 minute burn session.” I am so grateful that my dad never had to hear that, it broke my heart. No matter if you decide to treat cancer with Prescription drugs, Chemo, Radiation or Alternative or Homeopathic ways, cancer is incredibly expensive. It really frustrates me that the cancer industry pulls in so much cash from fundraising and donations. There are families financially struggling because CANCER IS EXPENSIVE, and the gov`t isn`t in any hurry to help you pay rent or buy groceries. We try to help cancer patients with our extra money, not donate it to the research industry.

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  69. Thank you for posting this!! In middle/high school, I was involved in Relay For Life for about 4 years. The only reason being, I had friends in it. It sounded all cool, you know, “trying to find a cure for cancer…”
    A couple years ago then, my mom told me this same thing: she doesn’t support the cure cancer foundations. She told me a lot of these same reasons, and I am so glad she said something. I totally agree with what you’re saying! It’s sad how these foundations came to be… there are so many good people out there who think that they’re helping out, but really, do not know the truth about these foundations.
    I’m going to share this post with my mom – cool to know that there are many others who believe the same!!

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  70. I used to be a Zumba instructor and helped out with a “Party in Pink” which was for Komen. I was horrified when I found out that Planned Parenthood was using even a little bit of the money they were given by Komen for abortions, but then I found out that Komen was mismanaging money themselves. My wife sent me here and I just have to say, thanks for the info! I believe a lot of what you said and my family has used Dr. Schulzes products (herbdoc.com) for many years now. Problem is we can’t help the environment we’re in, but we can watch what we eat, exercise, and take supplements to make sure our body gets the nutrients it needs to fight off anything on it’s own.
    Thanks again for this article!

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  71. I am presently fighting cancer…an aggressive form of lymphoma. I appreciate the posts that defend the use of chemotherapy/radiation. Quite frankly, they saved my life. While I understand that it must be difficult to watch a loved one suffer through the side effects of chemotherapy, please don’t make such strong comments unless you’ve been there. It is awful. It is the worst thing I’ve ever been through in my life. But I had a tumor in my chest wrapped around my trachea, stuck to the side of a lung, wrapped around a major blood vessel, tucked in behind my aorta, and crushing some important vessels in my chest. I was a week away ( or so) from dying. Chemotherapy saved my life. I am not out of the woods yet…and I’ve been doing this for 6 months. But it really bothers me to hear people pass judgement on certain treatments. If I had the time, I would have tried a more holistic approach. However, holistic approaches don’t have many statistics to back them up…whereby chemotherapy does. When you have cancer…will you chose something that you don’t really know whether it will kill your cancer cells…or will you go with something that gives you a 70%chance of being cured? I chose the 70%chance.

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    • Terri-Lynne, you are so right. Walk a mile in someone else’s shoes before passing judgement. 🙂 I took care of my mama while cancer ravaged her body. When faced with losing your own life or that of a loved one (esp. Mama), whatever it takes becomes your motto. Best of luck to you and I hope you are doing GREAT!
      Joy

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  72. I totally agree. Our local grocery store is involved in a campaign to raise money for a local children’s cancer research hospital. They have started looking at me funny every time I say “no thank you” but, like you, I cringe internally.

    Chemotherapy is so nasty and rarely works. When a cancer patient that has had chemo stops eating a SAD and begins to juice and eat raw, their bodies throw off the toxins. It can be so harsh as to *actually make the paint in their bedrooms peel!

    Great blog. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and expertise with us.

    *According to Charlotte Gerson of the Gerson Institute

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  73. I like Terri-Lynne am fighting Cancer; I was diagnosised having Colon Cancer and needed chemo and radiation. I became very informed about side effects and survival rates. I was astonish My procedure of radiation for 28 treatments, surgery and a total of 8 months chemo gave me a survival rate of 85-90% as compared 15% for no chemo and no radiation and just surgery . Yes I believe there is a misuse of funds but there also is a massive amount that does go to the right places also. Now getting to your assumptions about these studies that you quote can you please post them? The wonderful thing about the internet is there is so much info out there for people to make informed decision that also is a big problem when this info doesn’t come with the facts. Your actuations go against all studies I have read? It would be almost criminal if someone made a decision base on someone’s personal ideology instead of facts.

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  74. I agree with you, Kate, on all aspects. I feel Big Pharma is all about making money on “cures” and not about truly curing. As well as these cancer cure institutes. If cancer could be cured with out Big Pharma’s big medicines of if they did find the magic bullet… they would go out of business. Visit Angelaharris.com. She was pregnant and given 3 months to live, but cured herself of stage 4 cancer using herbs. She had bulging tumors you could see and she cured herself AND saved her baby, which the doctors told her she needed to abort so she could save herself. She said NO. Her daughter is now a healthy adult and Angela is thriving. Herbs are foods, not quackery. My mother-in-law died of stage 4 colon cancer 6 years ago. Chemo gave her 11 months more and I sometimes wonder had she chosen whole foods and juicing if she’d still be with us today. She wanted to cure herself with faith and nutrition, but unfortunately, she felt pressured to use conventional methods and they put fear in her if she didn’t use chemo. I wish that choices were given in the doctor’s office/hospitals for all methods and patients views on curing themselves taken into consideration more, instead of given chemo and radiation as the ONLY choice. Patients are usually viewed as inept and “misinformed.” If I am ever diagnosed with cancer, I will find the strength to not be bullied into conventional methods and follow in Angela Harris’ footsteps. Are there some cancers that may need alternative AND conventional methods to cure the patient, probably. But, for Big Pharma to repress cures they can’t make money off of is unacceptable and people HAVE cured themselves with faith and nutrition… and faith and nutrition I feel is the first choice, surgery, chemo and radiation the VERY LAST!

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  75. My dad watched, in the 50s, as America was swept with polio. His little 3yr old cousin got it, and, being so young and so little, she was unable to fight it. She died 3 days before her 4th birthday. She was near the end of an epidemic that lasted almost 10yrs, and had ‘research foundations’ popping up left and right to ‘find a cure’. It wasn’t until the American people became disillusioned with them and stopped donating money that a CURE was found. The vaccination for polio was discovered TEN YEARS before they started production of it, simply because it was not a financial advantage to the foundations to ‘find a cure’.
    My dad remembers a news commentary show (something like Nightline, tho he can’t remember what show it was) doing a segment on the corruption and misuse of money involved in the ‘research foundations’, and many people stopped donating money. Within MONTHS the vaccine went into mass production.
    I do not support ANY type of medical research. Cancer. Heart research. Autism. ANY of the foundations we are bombarded with on a daily basis. Because I believe they already HAVE cures for these things. They already HAVE what Americans and the rest of the world need to know. But as long as we are giving them money, and they are getting rich making 500k/yr + salaries, why would they EVER kill the goose that is laying so many golden eggs?!? It is only when we stop handing them MONEY and start handing them DEMANDS that we will EVER see a cure.

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  76. Cancer is a money making business. There are proven alternative treatments that are much less expensive than chemo and do not have the aweful side effects. Unfortunately these treatments have been rejected by the FDA and AMA because they are not profitable. It sounds crazy, but it’s true. Read “Reclaiming Our Health” by John Robbins.

    Yes, there are some forms of cancer that can be successfully treated with chemo and radiation drugs, but there are many cancers that can be treated with diet and other methods that do not destroy your body in the process.

    Our country is so reliant on drugs to fix all our medical problems. But most common diseases/sickness (including heart disease, diabetes, and YES, some forms of CANCER) can be PREVENTED by eating a healthy, whole foods based diet. Just look at all the crap we are putting into our bodies – fast food, soda, processed sugars, preservatives, candy. No wonder cancer rates have skyrocketted over the past few decades.

    .

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  77. Talking about screenings. I do Rely for Life because a dear friend died of breast cancer. She was 65 when she died three years ago. She had never been screened found a lump and did nothing. Nine months later she did go see a Dr in June. By then she had tumors all over and died 6 months later. I don’t know anything about my dads side so I get one every year just in case I miss finding it. If a dr told me without treatment I had 6 weeks I’d go for it and fight. If it was one lump caught in time and removed sure I’d go the natural way first. My thing is making sure every woman/teen can get it even if they have no ins. so they won’t die like my friend. I did my term paper in high school on non-Hoskins limp… Can’t spell it Because I had a friend with it

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  78. I agree with you 100%! If they are trying to raise $$ for research, why are they getting paid so much!

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  79. I absolutely wholeheartedly agree! My daughter was horrified the other day when the Walmart cashier asked me if I wanted to donate to the American Cancer Society and I said “no, thank you.” Yes, we have had many cases of cancer in my family and I myself had melanoma, but these foundations are not helping. Can you imagine the billions of dollars that have been raised over the years, and where has it gotten us? Cancer treatments are a huge business – do you think they want to kill this cash cow? The vast majority of cancers are preventable and are diet and lifestyle-related. I do support The Cancer Project, which promotes healthy diet and educates people in that regard. And there are natural cancer cures, one notable and apparently highly successful one being the Budwig Diet developed by Dr. Johanna Budwig. I know how frightening it can be to get that diagnosis, and the panic and desperation that you feel, and I don’t condemn anyone for their personal choices. But do change your diet and lifestyle now to minimize your risks, do take a deep breath and prayerfully consider your alternatives if you are faced with a cancer diagnosis (or any other diagnosis, for that matter), and do realize that you can do natural treatments with those your doctor recommends (after of course discussing it with your physician).

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  80. Please do not link cancer only to nutrition. It is also very emotional and spiritual which is why the whole reasoning why cancer preexisted our times and goes as far as ancient Greece where even Hippocrates noted it, is not only due to nutrition. The body is not just made up of nutrition. It is made up of an emotional center. And a spiritual center. A hormone center. So there are many variables why cancer comes up in a body.

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    • @Preeti Menon

      Of course. But today, a main reason why people aren’t healthy and get these conditions and sicknesses (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc) is because of their lifestyle, in which diet contributes the most these days. But i do agree. Stress and stuff can be a factor also

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  81. how sickening and offending. how much more greed can come out of industries that are supposed to be for the people?
    first the food industry, now our own non-profit organizations.
    i find the fact that the cancer organization that partnered with kfc you were talking about is just … corruption.

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  82. Agreed! Thank you for being brave enough to share your thoughts…I thought I was alone in feeling this way. After “racing for the cure” for several years, my father learned he had stage 4 bone cancer and was given a few months to live – that was two years ago. He initially took his chances with chemo as the doctors convinced him that was the ONLY way he’d survive a few months. However, the chemo began killing him…after only a few rounds, he had multiple strokes and had to make the choice to die from chemo, or die from cancer. He chose instead to change his life style…followed the China Study approach and removed stress from his life. Two years later, you would NEVER know he was sick AT ALL. It’s like watching a walking miracle. His blood levels are all healthier than they’ve been EVER and his Oncologist is literally scratching his head, totally befuddled. His drastic turn-around opened my families eyes to many documentaries, nutritional healing sites and has wisened us up. I agree with Preeti – that it is more than just nutritious food…that hormones, emotional well being, and spiritual health need to be taken in to consideration…although I think nutrition plays a big part of hormonal and emotional health. I can’t say chemo should never be used…honestly, I’m not educated or knowledgable enough to make that bold of a statement. However, I think in many cases nutrition can be used as a way to prevent cancer and even cure it. Thanks for your post!

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  83. Cancer is as old as human history. It has been proven that ancient Egyptians had suffered from cancer. I had many relatives that had cancer and had lost the battle, and I’m still skeptical about cancer treatments. I really don’t care too much about foundations that are claiming to be looking for a cure for cancer, because there is really no such thing.

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  84. Maybe you need to research St. Baldricks.
    And then maybe ask my daughter how she feels that she will never meet her father because cancer took him from us when I was four months pregnant. And after that, ask me how I feel everyday looking at my daughter and seeing his face.
    No, I do not support Susan G. Komen. My support goes to St. Judes and St. Baldricks (three year head shavee right here). What do you want someone with cancer to do? What do you want a mom to do? Sit back and watch their child die because chemo can be dangerous or radiation can be dangerous. Hope to God the whole foods they are eating and the herbs they take may magically cure their child? Until you have been in those shoes, have had to watch a loved one take their last breath, have to figure out how to tell your child she never gets to meet her daddy because of cancer, then you can talk about how you can cure cancer with a more natural approach. And maybe if you have some good idea, why don’t you try curing cancer or preventing it?

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    • Hi Caitlin,

      I’m sorry for your experience. I cannot imagine how hard it must have been to lose your husband, especially while pregnant.

      I’m not a doctor so no, I’m not out there curing or preventing cancer. I’m just spreading a message of another way. I haven’t had a family member go through this, but I have a close friend who was diagnosed with fairly invasive cancer a few weeks ago. She and I will be talking about her story and our thoughts on this matter in a few months. However, I have to say that my feelings about this have not changed…and she agrees with me too.

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  85. Thank you for the wonderful article Kate, I could not agree more. My mother died some 25 years ago from cancer- even though she was considered a “survivor” because she lingered with cancer for over eight years, I have been in the closet on my opinion and convictions on what conventional medicine has not done and most likely may never do, and that is cure cancer. I have felt misunderstood for not jumping on the pink ribbon caner cure wagon, you have articulated many things that I have’t been able to express, thank you again, I’m sharing this with loved ones.

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  86. Thank you for this post. My dad was diagnosed with three forms of Lymphoma in 2009. The doctors told him that one could be cured with chemo, but the others were incurable, but slow acting. My parents decided they would fight it. After a lot of soul-searching, they changed their diet 100%. No more eating out 4x/week, no more steaks, sugars and ice cream. They started eating whole, healthy foods. My dad went ahead with the chemo. A year later the cancer was back, and he did radiation. Last year they went in to see if the the radiation had worked and the doctors couldn’t believe it: all three types of lymphoma the two kinds they said were incurable) were gone. My dad is now healthier than he was in 2008. Another benefit is that my mom lost 50 lbs and has never felt better.

    Because of this, both my mom and I have a hard time with “support the cure” cancer fund. We both think the cure has been found! And, sadly, hidden from the public. We’re grateful for the wonderful doctors and nurses my dad worked with, but we really believe he was cured because of his lifestyle changes, not their medicine.

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    • Oh this tears my heart out. This could have been the story of my father in law…he wasn’t willing to change his diet…chemo killed him. One injection was all it took. He was whisked to the ICU and we never saw him awake again. He passed 3 days later. His body couldn’t handle the poison. 🙁 I know had he been committed he could have fought it and been with us today. 🙁

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  87. I worked at the American Cancer Society in Honolulu as a temp years ago…all the “top execs” there drove brand new Mercedes and Porches. I’m guessing they were paid disgustingly well!

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  88. A few years ago I was mortified when my Mother pointed to a key chain I had purchased and told me she did not support the whole Pink Ribbon campaign. I honestly thought she was bonkers. Since then my eyes have been opened and I have to say I agree 100%. Why do we push mammograms as early detection tools when a tumor has to have grown for 10 years in order for it to be large enough to show up? Not to mention the procedure can cause more Cancer itself. I learned about thermography a few months ago, but I have never heard it mentioned by mainstream doctors. Thermography can detect tumors at two years of growth and it is non evasive and does not cause additional Cancer (that I am aware of). And for those who get up in arms because they have had loved ones die, my entire family except my Mom, brother and I have died from Cancer. I wish I knew then what I knew now because I would have convinced them to try to look into alternative treatments.

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  89. Totally agree. I have thought this way for years.

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  90. I agree with you…I do….but I’ve worked in paediatric oncology and you try telling a mother whose just been told her 4 year old has cancer to take the risk exploring what it is essentially ‘alternative’ and unproven. In absolute fear that mother will almost always choose the conventional way first…and I don’t blame them. A friend was recently diagnosed with breast cancer same age as me – 30 and with 2 young kids. She wanted to explore the alternative route but said she was just desperate to NOT DIE and would follow doctors orders in absolute desperation. She is exploring complimentary medicine however…vitamin c infusions etc…to help deal with the effects of the chemo. So although I totally agree with everything when I see the desperation of people fighting this disease I totally understand why they take the conventional route.

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    • Sadly this is true because FEAR takes over. And I don’t know, I might be the same in that situation. You almost lose your ability to rationally think and need someone to just tell you what to do. But that’s the sad part…because the ONLY things they tell you to do are the MOST BARBARIC of treatments! In all our medical technology and we resort to injecting venom to cure? It doesn’t even make sense. But I do totally get what you are saying but that just shows in a sense how brainwashed we have all been and how blinded to the real truth! There ARE other ways out there. Good ways. Ways that truly DO cure. Do they all work 100% of the time? No, of course not there are just too many other factors out there and we live in a toxic world. But the rate of success of many natural treatments is much higher even than that of chemo! It’s crazy! So, that said, we all need to take a stand and expose the truth together so that maybe, decades from now, things will look much much different.

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  91. I just get a kick out of messing with people (especially checkers at grocery stores) who ask me “Would you like to support breast cancer/MS/etc. by purchasing” this or that. Why exactly would I want to _support_ these diseases? When someone takes the time to think about what they’re saying, I will at least consider their request, but I only very rarely actually take them up on it.

    I also hate “awareness” campaigns. Seriously…..is there someone in the US who doesn’t know that breast cancer exists or that it’s bad? Aren’t there better ways to spend your money and time? The ones that drive me the craziest are the Facebook ones “tell us where your purse is and what color your bra is, but DON’T TELL ANYONE WHAT YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT OR WHY.” What freaking good does that do? It doesn’t even “raise awareness!” Arg…..but it makes people “feel like they’re doing something” and that’s really all that matters.

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  92. Agree, but I am sad, because my very healthy 40 year old, friend died from breast cancer, and went the natural route. She was a vegetarian who ate very healthy, and sought to do natural measures to cure cancer, the hallelujah diet, and other things, but it spread and she passed less than a year ago. What then? I wish I could agree that diet and health could prevent or heal all cancer, but that doesn’t seem true. Maybe just many cancers?

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    • It is really hard to say. Everyone’s path is going to look different. And health is so…misunderstood these days. It’s impossible to say what happened in any particular case, but to a couple of people I’ve talked to, they know that there was a toxic build up from stress, poor eating habits (even in those who usually tried to do well), and other issues that contributed to cancer. Often times I think we are oblivious to these. And sometimes they are environmental and beyond our control. It’s impossible to say for any individual, but some form of this is usually true. And we can’t always, unfortunately, overcome it.

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      • I am reading a book right now called The Healing Code and in this book the doctors talk about stress being the number one reason why people cannot get well. Even after they’ve gone through chemo and the cancer is gone the only way their body will heal is if some how their immune system kicks in, takes over and fights to complete the healing process. However, if there is stress, the immune system is compromised and will not function. This books walks the readers through steps to alleviate stress. The research they have done is amazing as well as the testimonies. I would encourage you to read this book. The Healing Code by Dr. Alex Loyd and Dr. Ben Johnson.

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  93. You must not know anyone who has had breast cancer. I have four women who are very close to me who have fought and conquered breast cancer. And they beat it using the “poison” that you mention here. Sometimes you have to choose the lesser of two evils. I can not speak for all cancer organizations, but I believe in Susan G. Komen, and I think you have very flippantly dismissed them. Many of these organizations do promote healthy lifestyles, and the salaries do not seem outrageous to me in this economy. Millions are sill going toward research – 86 percent of what is brought in. A world-wide company does need staff. I hope you never get breast cancer, but if you do, I am sure you will chane your opinion of cancer research and treatment.

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    • Yes, I do. One of my good friends was diagnosed with breast cancer this past spring. I watched what she went through. I still stand by what I said. And you know what? So does she. She’s a breast cancer survivor who does not believe in these organizations. So your generalization that I only think this because I’ve in no way been touched by cancer is false. Not everyone who has cancer or who has a close friend/family member with cancer is going to make the same choices…or support these organizations. I maintain that the salaries ARE outrageous, and last I checked, it wasn’t anything like 86% going to research. And that “research” is only for the chemical treatments…never alternative options. So I completely stand by what I said: I don’t support these foundations.

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  94. This was AWESOME. I’m so tired of people’s ignorance and victim mentality when it comes to cancer (and other illnesses for that matter). It’s much easier to blame fate than take responsibility for your lifestyle choices.

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  95. For all we know, the government or some private organization could have already found the cure, but they kept it secret so the cure is only available within their special group, while milking the poor people into thinking they still need our money to find the cure.

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  96. Would be awesome if we can somehow put a tracker on our money when we donate, and see where it goes? If its really for the research of cancer, and I am fully supportive.

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  97. I couldn’t have said it better!!!!! Thank you for this post and this research. 🙂 I agree 100%. As far as natural cures to check out definitely start with these: Budwig (budwig-videos on facebook is excellent), Gerson, Laetrille therapy and the use of baking soda and an alkaline diet. It is so amazing how much information is out there! It’s intriguing. And sad that it’s not mainstream. I do plan on running a marathon that supports one of these foundations…only because it’s one I enjoy and love and have done in the past…but this past year I have learned so much and plan on using that race to get the truth out there. My shirt will be full of the true cures that already exist so that passerbys perhaps get a glimpse and can go home later and see for themselves. If you have ideas on this….do let me know! We need to get this info out there. It’s too important not to and swiftly becoming truly a matter of life and death.

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  98. First, let me say that my dad died of stomach cancer at the age of 71. He was gone a month after the diagnosis, so there was no time for chemo or radiation. With that being said, I do NOT support “cancer cure” foundations. Seriously, I truly believe there already is a cure for cancer. Revealing the cure would spur a dramatic enonomic change. Hospitals, doctors, technicians, reseachers, and the list goes on, would be put out of business. Instead, thousands of people die from cancer, not to mention the suffering – physically, mentally, emotionally and financially. It’s unlikely, but I would rather see the money go to the individuals who really need it! After all, we can put people on the moon, have space stations, etc. – don’t you think we would have found a cure by now with all the technology available to us today?

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  99. I agree except I do donate to St. Judes.

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  100. I don’t support them, but for another reason. (I did not read all of the comments, so I’m not sure if this has been mentioned.) When my mother-in-law was battling breast cancer, she went to several “cure cancer” foundations for help with the cost of what her insurance didn’t cover. Though my in-laws do not make a huge amount, my mother-in-law is a homemaker and my father-in-law is an electrician, they were denied any help. These foundations “set aside money for those who cannot afford treatment,” but do not offer that help to families who truly need it. So, for some of your reasons, and that reason, I do not walk, crawl, skip or jump for a cure, either.

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  101. Funding Planned Parenthood…elective abortion actually INCREASES a woman’s risk for breast cancer!

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    • Yes, this is why I don’t support Susan G Komen, but the above points are also good reasons. Let’s be careful not to assert that cancer wouldn’t happen if we did X, Y & Z. I’ve known/heard of/read about people eating extremely healthily and they still got cancer. There will be no cure, until we’re in heaven, because this is a fall world!

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    • No, that’s not true, that’s well known anti-abortion propaganda. You may not support a woman’s right to choose any and all reproductive care, but abortion is not a factor in breast cancer.

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  102. Well put Katie! I don’t support them either, I cringe too!

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  103. I was reading your comments about why you don’t support “CANCER CURE FOUNDATION” and I wondered what you thought about the goodwill. I am getting rid of a lot of my stuff and wanted to donate to a worthy cause. I always donate to the Goodwill because it is easy but what are your thoughts?

    In my neighborhood, however, I get these giant empty plastic bags for donation requests for “Cancer Cure Foundation” and thought maybe this time I would just fill up this bag rather than to goodwill, however when I went on the internet to look them up I couldn’t find much information about them and how they distribute their donations. What organizations do you think are worth giving to when it comes to donating and greening out our houses and decluttering or kids closets and toys.

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  104. I agree that I do not support the drive to fund more research for breast cancer. I have read Suzanne Somers, “Knockout” twice now. She relates her own experience with this. She interviewed many Dr.s and found they were not using the standard medical practices of surgery, Chemo and radiation. They are offering hope to those who realize the failure of those practices. She supports those who are offering much more natural and better ways to address this disease.

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  105. …wait until your 17 month old is completely randomly one day diagnosed with a brain tumor and given a 10% chance of living and then you are incredibly desperate and eternally grateful to anyone who has ever given a single penny towards helping a cause that is greater than themselves. Some of it may be misspent, but his cancer is so rare the only way almost any research has been funded is from private fundraisers and cure groups. I wish I could write each and everyone of those people that have ever donated a thank you note.

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    • and the protocol that was developed through this research has increased the survival rate to 50%! We used nutrition and alternative methods as well to get him to be able to take the chemo rounds better.

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    • Hi Katy,

      I’m sorry to hear about your child. There are good charities out there that deserve support. There are bad charities too. I refuse to support the bad ones.

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  106. So brave, so true and I am 100% behind you. It’s about time these so called “charities” were shown up for exactly what they are. A lot of people can’t see behind the words cancer, charity. The don’t see the money grabbing organisers behind these schemes. The people who run them NEVER want to see a CURE for a cancer, as that would put them put of business. I will say it again, very brave and very true. My very best regards.

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  107. I certainly understand and agree with your concerns about many organizations that raise money to fight cancer. My concern is that we miss the aspect of cancer that is not solved medically or by changing our diet: Cancer is not a random occurrence. It is an enemy that targets our bodies and must be fought against on a spiritual level as well as on a medical level. See The Cancer Cure Experiment (www.thecancercureexperiment.com) for more details.

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  108. […] place, we won’t need all these walks and rallies and games to try to “fight” breast cancer.  I don’t generally support all these foundations anyway, because they only research more mainstream drugs and procedures to “fight” cancer that […]

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  109. […] fall we talked about “Why I Don’t Support Cure Cancer Foundations.”  Which was a monumental post.  Read it if you’re new here.  (I was […]

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I’m Kate, mama to 5 and wife to Ben.  I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.  I’m also a big fan of “fancy” drinks (anything but plain water counts as ‘fancy’ in my world!) and I can’t stop myself from DIY-ing everything.  I sure hope you’ll stick around so I can get to know you better!

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